At Black Nore Lighthouse & Early Walkers

Two poems recently shared with Black Bough poetry’s Top Tweet Tuesday.

A view across to South Wales from Portishead over the Severn and living ghosts encountered on a walk.

Black Note Lighthouse, a metallic structure on stilts at Portishead.

At Black Nore Lighthouse

Lofted above a scaggy, driftwood scattered beach, 
lording over chunks of rock, a stilted steam-punk 
iron torch, painted in off-white, all warnings retired
and snubbed by squatting seabirds – resting up 
on tiny Ynys Deny/Denny Island, out amongst 
the sandbanks – in cackling mockery of borders,
behind us, a small town rapidly expands, 
ahead, the waters of the Severn unite the coast 
of post-industrial South Wales and this western edge 
of England, here, someone’s left a fire to smoulder, 
its acrid smoke ghosts drift across the channel, 
where silhouettes of distant hills loom, like invitations.

Early walkers

Two figures shimmer on the path, 
struggling with a skittish charge, 
a team of walking echoes,
enduring ghosts, ancient drovers, 
journeys long complete, foot carving 
chalk routes a fraction deeper, 
close up, it’s clear they’re parents, caught 
up inside a toddler’s dawning delight, 
as she totters away, off into history.

2 thoughts on “At Black Nore Lighthouse & Early Walkers

  1. Black Nore, my local lighthouse! A charming coastal treasure, its location and demeanor so nicely portrayed here! But, as a once upon a long-distant, and brief time, dweller in West Wales it’s that last line that made me catch my breath, “where silhouettes of distant hills loom, like invitations” it’s the perfect echo of the permanent, quiet yearning I have to return there; though not Welsh, I think I might still be afflicted by “hiraeth”! Lovely poem.

    Liked by 1 person

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